View Our COVID Policies

Recurrent Corneal Erosion

Patients with frequent early morning pain and photophobia may have a condition called a recurrent corneal erosion. These sudden spasms of pain and tearing are caused by a break in the corneal epithelial barrier. The cause can be an old injury such as a poke from a baby’s finger or the cause may be inherited dystrophy. The treatment is usually conservative at first. If the pain persists, the cornea can be treated with various office-based procedures to eliminate the opening of the corneal surface epithelium.

corneal-erosion_96824968

A cause of mild to moderate visual blurring in patients over 65 years of age is a thickening or degeneration of the corneal basement membrane. The uneven basement membrane thickness can cause visual symptoms if it occurs over a part of the visual axis.

Corneal Basement Membrane Degeneration

A cause of mild to moderate visual blurring in patients over 65 years of age is a thickening or degeneration of the corneal basement membrane. The uneven basement membrane thickness can cause visual symptoms if it occurs over a part of the visual axis.

The condition is subtle and often escapes detection at first. Once detected, it can be easily removed in the office with scraping and the use of a rotating battery-powered micro-brush. The visual improvement can be dramatic if the degeneration bisects the visual axis of the patient.

Pterygium Eye

Pterygia are pinkish, wedge-shaped areas of abnormal tissue growth of the conjunctiva that extends onto the cornea. They are thought to be associated with repeated or prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun, since they are more commonly found in sunny climates and in the 20-40 age group. Pterygia are benign lesions that are often asymptomatic. Sometimes, however, they can become red and inflamed, large, or thickened to the point that they become bothersome to the patient or cause visual distortion. Often patients will complain of a foreign body sensation in the eye or for cosmetic reasons, will seek treatment of the pterygium. The best course of treatment will be determined by your ophthalmologist and depends on the size and extent of the pterygium and the symptoms it causes. Treatment can range from mild steroid drops to surgical removal of the tissue. Recently developed surgical techniques have reduced the recurrence rate of pterygia and healing time after surgery.

B29-300x213

Contact Us today for top-quality Eye care in Sonoma County

LET’S FIND THE SOLUTION

Schedule a Consultation

  • * All indicated fields must be completed.
    Please include non-medical questions and correspondence only.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Call Now Button Scroll to Top